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Counter Terrorism updates: OFAC giveth (to Afghanistan)…

OFAC today has issued 3 new Afghanistan-related General Licebses for the counter terrorism sanctions program:

  • General License 17 (Authorizing Official Business of the United States Government)
  • General License 18 (Authorizing Official Activities of Certain International Organizations and Other International Entities)
  • General Licenses 19 (Authorizing Certain Transactions in Support of Nongovernmental Organizations’ Activities in Afghanistan)

OFAC also issued a Fact Sheet on “Provision of Humanitarian Assistance to Afghanistan and Support for the Afghan People” – I’ll post it in a separate post.

Also, OFAC has added new:

950. For purposes of Afghanistan General License (GL) 18, “Official Activities of Certain International Organizations and Other International Entities,” what organizations are included within the United Nations’ “Programmes, Funds, and Other Entities and Bodies, as well as its Specialized Agencies and Related Organizations”? Answer

For an organizational chart of the United Nations, which lists the Programmes, Funds, and Other Entities and Bodies, as well as the Specialized Agencies and Related Organizations covered by GL 18 , including the World Bank, please see this page on the United Nations website.

951. Is Afghanistan subject to comprehensive sanctions?Answer

No.  In contrast to sanctions programs administered and enforced by OFAC with regard to North Korea, Cuba, Iran, Syria, and the Crimea region of Ukraine, there are no comprehensive sanctions on Afghanistan.  Therefore, there are no OFAC-administered sanctions that prohibit the export or reexport of goods or services to Afghanistan, moving or sending money into and out of Afghanistan, or activities in Afghanistan, provided that such transactions or activities do not involve sanctioned individuals, entities, or property in which sanctioned individuals and entities have an interest.

Certain Afghanistan-related individuals and entities are included on OFAC’s List of Specially Designated Nationals and Blocked Persons (SDN List), most notably the Taliban and the Haqqani Network.  The Taliban are designated as a Specially Designated Global Terrorist (SDGT) under Executive Order (E.O.) 13224.  The Haqqani Network is designated as an SDGT under E.O. 13224 and a Foreign Terrorist Organization (FTO) under section 219 of the Immigration and Nationality Act.  Transactions or activities by U.S. persons that involve these entities are generally prohibited.  

In addition, OFAC has issued GLs 1415161718, and 19under the Global Terrorism Sanctions Regulations, 31 CFR part 594 (GTSR), the Foreign Terrorist Organizations Sanctions Regulations, 31 CFR part 597 (FTOSR), and E.O. 13224, as amended.  For a consolidated list of all relevant General Licenses and FAQs, please see OFAC’s humanitarian Fact Sheet , “Provision of Humanitarian Assistance to Afghanistan and Support for the Afghan People,” that provides an overview of the relevant authorizations and guidance related to U.S. sanctions on the Taliban and the Haqqani Network. 

In addition to the Taliban and the Haqqani Network, there are other Afghanistan-related individuals and entities on the SDN List, including certain individual members of the Taliban or Haqqani Network explicitly designated as SDGTs, and other individuals and entities designated under other sanctions programs, such as Counter Narcotics Trafficking Sanctions. Transactions or activities that involve these sanctioned persons or property in which such persons have an interest are generally prohibited, unless exempt from regulation or authorized by OFAC. GLs 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, and 19 do not authorize transactions or activities that involve these other sanctioned persons or property in which such persons have an interest.

952. When operating in Afghanistan, how can I tell who is a member of the Taliban or the Haqqani Network, which are designated are Specially Designated Global Terrorists (SDGT) under U.S. counterterrorism sanctions?Answer

A number of members of the Taliban and/or the Haqqani Network are explicitly included on OFAC’s List of Specially Designated Nationals and Blocked Persons (SDN List).  Persons operating in Afghanistan can use OFAC’s SDN List Search Tool to identify such members of the Taliban or the Haqqani Networks explicitly included on the SDN List, as well as other individuals or entities explicitly subject to U.S. sanctions.  For more information on using OFAC’s SDN List Search Tool and assessing OFAC Name Matches, please see OFAC FAQs 582, 246-253, 287, 369, 467, and 892.  Counterterrorism General Licenses (GLs) 1415161718, and 19  do not authorize transactions or activities that involve these sanctioned persons or property in which such persons have an interest.

OFAC would encourage any person operating in Afghanistan to use all information at their disposal when assessing their risk for sanctions exposure. Supplementing internal due diligence information with an array of open-source material can be an effective compliance practice to aid in identifying risky counterparties involved in any in-country activity. For more information on OFAC due diligence expectations and compliance programs, please see FAQs 25, 27-31 and A Framework for OFAC Compliance Commitments .

953. Do U.S. sanctions on the Taliban and the Haqqani Network prohibit moving or sending money into or out of Afghanistan?  Do U.S. sanctions prohibit or require a particular method of payment for moving or sending money into or out of Afghanistan?Answer

No.  U.S. sanctions on the Taliban and the Haqqani Network do not prohibit the movement of funds into or out of Afghanistan, provided that the transactions do not involve blocked individuals or entities, or property in which a blocked person has an interest.  

In addition, OFAC has issued General Licenses (GLs) 1415161718, and 19 under the Global Terrorism Sanctions Regulations, 31 CFR part 594 (GTSR), the Foreign Terrorist Organizations Sanctions Regulations, 31 CFR part 597 (FTOSR), and E.O. 13224, as amended.  For a consolidated list of all relevant General Licenses and FAQs, please see OFAC’s humanitarian Fact Sheet , “Provision of Humanitarian Assistance to Afghanistan and Support for the Afghan People,” that provides an overview of the relevant authorizations and guidance related to U.S. sanctions on the Taliban and the Haqqani Network. 

U.S. sanctions on the Taliban and the Haqqani Network do not prohibit — and GLs 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, and 19 do not require — any particular method for moving or sending money into or out of Afghanistan. When selecting a method of payment — including electronic transfer or hand carrying of funds — OFAC urges due diligence tailored to the particular sanctions risks to ensure that payments do not involve individuals or entities identified on OFAC’s List of Specially Designated Nationals and Blocked Persons (SDN List) or whose property and interests in property are otherwise blocked, unless exempt from regulation or authorized by OFAC. For more information on OFAC due diligence expectations and compliance programs, please see FAQs 25, 27-31 and A Framework for OFAC Compliance Commitments.

954. Are purchases of fuel, payment for telecommunications services, payment for security services, payment of rent, and payment of utilities by nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) considered ordinarily incident and necessary to authorized activities under General Licenses (GLs) 14, 15, and 19?Answer

The purchases of fuel, payment for telecommunications services, payment for security services, payment of rent, and payment of utilities may be authorized under GLs 1415, and 19 provided that they are ordinarily incident and necessary to effectuate the activities authorized by the GLs.  As with all OFAC GLs, GLs 14, 15, and 19 are “self-executing,” meaning that persons who determine that such activities are ordinarily incident and necessary to their authorized activity within the scope of the GL may proceed without further assurance from OFAC.  

In addition, OFAC has issued GL 17 to authorize all transactions that are for the conduct of the official business of the United States Government by employees, grantees, or contractors and that involve the Taliban or the Haqqani Network, or any entity in which the Taliban or the Haqqani Network owns, directly or indirectly, individually or in the aggregate, a 50 percent or greater interest.  OFAC also issued GL 18 to authorize all transactions that are for the conduct of official business by employees, grantees, or contractors of certain international organizations (IOs) and that involve the Taliban or the Haqqani Network, or any entity in which the Taliban or the Haqqani Network owns, directly or indirectly, individually or in the aggregate, a 50 percent or greater interest.

In all cases, authorized transactions and activities must comply with the terms and conditions set forth in GLs 14, 15, 17, 18, and 19.  Notably, these GLs explicitly do not authorize financial transfers to the Taliban or the Haqqani Network, other than for the purpose of effecting the payment of taxes, fees, or import duties, or the purchase or receipt of permits, licenses, or public utility services related to the activities specified.  In addition, these GLs do not relieve any person from compliance with other U.S. federal laws or requirements of other federal agencies, or from applicable international obligations.

If individuals, entities, international organizations, or financial institutions have questions about engaging in or processing transactions related to these authorizations, they can contact OFAC’s Sanctions Compliance and Evaluation Division most efficiently via email at OFAC_Feedback@treasury.gov. Sanctions Compliance and Evaluation may also be reached via phone at (800) 540-6322 or (202) 622-2490. OFAC prioritizes license applications, compliance questions, and other requests that are related to humanitarian support.

955. Are General Licenses (GLs) 17, 18, and 19 consistent with the UN Security Council’s 1988 (Taliban) sanctions regime?Answer

These GLs authorize certain activities that would otherwise be prohibited under U.S. sanctions on the Taliban and the Haqqani Network.  Given the scope of these domestic sanctions, these GLs authorize many activities that do not implicate the UN Security Council ‘s 1988 (Taliban) sanctions regime.  In addition, these GLs do not relieve any person from compliance with other U.S. federal laws or requirements of other federal agencies, or from applicable international obligations.

GLs 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, and 19 also help implement recently adopted UNSCR 2615 (2021), which authorizes humanitarian assistance and other activities that support basic human needs as those terms are understood by the UN Security Council, as well as the processing and payment of funds, other financial assets or economic resources, and the provision of goods and services necessary to ensure the timely delivery of such assistance or to support such activities. Specifically, UNSCR 2615 (2021) was intended to cover activities contemplated in the United Nations’ Transitional Engagement Framework (TEF) for Afghanistan, such as providing life-saving assistance; sustaining essential services; and preserving social investments and community-level systems essential to meeting basic human needs.

and updated existing:

928. Do U.S. sanctions on the Taliban and the Haqqani Network prohibit the provision of humanitarian assistance to Afghanistan?  Answer

No.  The Taliban are designated as Specially Designated Global Terrorists (SDGTs) under Executive Order (E.O.) 13224, as amended.  The Haqqani Network is designated as an SDGT under E.O. 13224 and a Foreign Terrorist Organization (FTO) under section 219 of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA).  These sanctions do not prohibit U.S. persons from exporting or reexporting goods or services to Afghanistan, provided that the transactions do not involve sanctioned individuals or entities, or property in which a blocked person has an interest unless exempt from regulation or authorized by OFAC.

In addition, OFAC has issued General License No. 14 (GL 14) to facilitate the continuation of humanitarian assistance to, and other activities that support basic human needs in, Afghanistan by nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and certain international organizations (IOs).  GL 14 authorizes the United States Government, NGOs, certain IOs, and their employees, grantees, contractors, or other persons acting on their behalf to provide humanitarian assistance to Afghanistan or other activities that support basic human needs in Afghanistan and that may involve the Taliban, the Haqqani Network, or any entity in which Taliban or the Haqqani Network owns, directly or indirectly, a 50 percent or greater interest, and that would otherwise be prohibited by the Global Terrorism Sanctions Regulations, 31 CFR part 594 (GTSR), the Foreign Terrorist Organizations Sanctions Regulations, 31 CFR part 597 (FTOSR), or Executive Order (E.O.) 13224, as amended, subject to certain conditions.  

GL 14 also authorizes U.S. persons to engage in transactions or activities that are ordinarily incident and necessary to authorized humanitarian assistance to or other activities that support basic human needs in Afghanistan.  However, GL 14 does not authorize any debit to a blocked account on the books of a U.S. financial institution.  In addition, GL 14 does not authorize financial transfers to the Taliban, the Haqqani Network, or any entity in which the Taliban or the Haqqani Network owns, directly or indirectly, a 50 percent or greater interest, other than for the purpose of effecting the payment of taxes, fees, or import duties, or the purchase or receipt of permits, licenses, or public utility services.  For purposes of clarity, transfers of funds to or from Afghanistan that are ordinarily incident and necessary to give effect to the activities authorized in GL 14, including clearing and settlement involving banks in Afghanistan, are authorized under GL 14.  

Persons authorized under GL 14 include the following entities and their employees, grantees, contractors, or other persons acting on their behalf:  (1) the United States Government; (2) NGOs; (3) the United Nations, including its Programmes, Funds, and Other Entities and Bodies, as well as its specialized Agencies and Related Organizations, which includes the World Bank; (4) the International Centre for Settlement of Investment Disputes (ICSID) and the Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency (MIGA); (5) the African Development Bank Group, the Asian Development Bank, the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, and the Inter-American Development Bank Group (IDB Group), including any fund entity administered or established by any of the foregoing; (6) the International Committee of the Red Cross and the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies; and (7) the Islamic Development Bank (ISDB).

For an organizational chart of the United Nations, which lists the Programmes, Funds, and Other Entities and Bodies, as well as the Specialized Agencies and Related Organizations covered by GL 14, please see the following page on the United Nations website:  https://www.un.org/en/pdfs/un_system_chart.pdf. 

For activity outside the scope of GL 14, OFAC may issue specific licenses on a case-by-case basis to authorize certain transactions involving U.S. persons or the U.S. financial system that may otherwise be prohibited by OFAC sanctions, provided those transactions are in the foreign policy interests of the United States.

If individuals, NGOs, IOs, companies, or financial institutions have questions about engaging in or processing transactions related to these authorizations, they may contact OFAC’s Sanctions Compliance and Evaluation Division most efficiently via email at OFAC_Feedback@treasury.gov. Sanctions Compliance and Evaluation may also be reached via phone at (800) 540-6322 or (202) 622-2490.

929. For the purposes of General License (GL) 14, what is “humanitarian assistance to Afghanistan” or “other activities that support basic human needs in Afghanistan”?Answer

For the purposes of GL 14, humanitarian assistance includes the provision of relief services related to natural and man-made disasters, the provision of healthcare and health-related services, protection and assistance for vulnerable or displaced populations (including women, individuals with disabilities, the elderly, survivors of violence, those incarcerated or detained, and the drug dependent), operation of orphanages, the distribution of articles (such as food, clothing, and medicine) intended to be used to relieve human suffering in Afghanistan, and training or other services related to any of the foregoing activities.  Other activities that support basic human needs include activities to support non-commercial development projects in Afghanistan that primarily benefit poor or at-risk populations or otherwise relieve human suffering, including activities related to shelter and settlement assistance, food security, livelihoods support, water, sanitation, health, hygiene, and COVID-19-related assistance, among others, and training or other services related to any of the foregoing activities.  However, in all cases, authorized humanitarian assistance and other activities that support basic human needs in Afghanistan must not entail financial transfers to the Taliban, the Haqqani Network, or any entity in which the Taliban or the Haqqani Network owns, directly or indirectly, a 50 percent or greater interest, other than for the purpose of effecting the payment of taxes, fees, and import duties, or the purchase or receipt of permits, licenses, or public utility services described in GL 14 and FAQ 928.

If individuals, NGOs, IOs, companies, or financial institutions have questions about engaging in or processing transactions related to these authorizations, they can contact OFAC’s Sanctions Compliance and Evaluation Division most efficiently via email at OFAC_Feedback@treasury.gov. Sanctions Compliance and Evaluation may also be reached via phone at (800) 540-6322 or (202) 622-2490.

931. Do non-U.S. persons risk exposure to U.S. sanctions for engaging in transactions that U.S. persons would be authorized to engage in under General Licenses (GLs) 14, 15 or 16?Answer

No.  Non-U.S. persons may engage in or facilitate transactions that would be authorized for U.S. persons under GLs 1415 or 16 without exposure to sanctions under the Global Terrorism Sanctions Regulations, 31 CFR part 594 (GTSR), the Foreign Terrorist Organizations Sanctions Regulations, 31 CFR part 597 (FTOSR), or Executive Order (E.O.) 13224, as amended. 

For example, activity that would be authorized by GLs 14, 15 or 16 if engaged in by a U.S. person would not be considered “significant” for the purposes of a secondary sanctions determination under E.O. 13224, as amended.  Accordingly, foreign financial institutions do not risk exposure to correspondent and payable-through account sanctions under E.O. 13224, as amended, if they knowingly conduct or facilitate a transaction on behalf of persons blocked under E.O. 13224, as amended, that would be authorized under GLs 14, 15 or 16 if engaged in by a U.S. person. 

If individuals, entities, companies, or financial institutions have questions about engaging in or processing transactions related to these authorizations, they can contact OFAC’s Sanctions Compliance and Evaluation Division most efficiently via email at OFAC_Feedback@treasury.gov. Sanctions Compliance and Evaluation may also be reached via phone at (800) 540-6322 or (202) 622-2490.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs).

The Treasury:

PRESS RELEASES

Treasury Issues Additional General Licenses and Guidance in Support of Humanitarian Assistance and Other Support to Afghanistan

December 22, 2021

WASHINGTON – Today, the U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) issued three General Licenses to facilitate the continued flow of humanitarian assistance and other support for the Afghan people. These actions underscore the United States’ commitment to support the people of Afghanistan and continue the U.S. government’s longstanding practice of authorizing the provision of humanitarian goods and services to areas affected by U.S. sanctions. Treasury’s OFAC also issued a Fact Sheet that highlights and consolidates all the relevant authorizations and guidance facilitating the flow of humanitarian assistance, personal remittances, and other support to the Afghan people.

“The United States is the largest single provider of humanitarian assistance in Afghanistan. We are committed to supporting the people of Afghanistan, which is why Treasury is taking these additional steps to facilitate assistance,” said Deputy Secretary of the Treasury Wally Adeyemo. “Unfortunately, the economy faces grave challenges, exacerbated by the country’s long dependence on foreign aid, donor and private sector flight sparked by the Taliban’s takeover, drought, structural macroeconomic issues, and the COVID-19 pandemic. Treasury has provided broad authorizations that ensure NGOs, international organizations, and the U.S. government can continue to provide relief to those in need.”

As part of Treasury’s commitment to enabling humanitarian assistance and other support to Afghanistan, OFAC issued the following General Licenses that expand upon existing authorizations related to the provision of humanitarian assistance and other activities that support basic human needs and enable broader support for the Afghan people:

  • General License 17 authorizes all transactions and activities involving the Taliban or the Haqqani Network that are for the conduct of the official business of the United States Government by employees, grantees, or contractors thereof, subject to certain conditions.
  • General License 18 authorizes all transactions and activities involving the Taliban or the Haqqani Network that are for the conduct of the official business of certain international organizations and other international entities by employees, grantees, or contractors thereof, subject to certain conditions.
  • General License 19 authorizes all transactions and activities involving the Taliban or the Haqqani Network, that are ordinarily incident and necessary to the following activities by nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), subject to certain conditions: humanitarian projects to meet basic human needs; activities to support rule of law, citizen participation, government accountability and transparency, human rights and fundamental freedoms, access to information, and civil society development projects; education; non-commercial development projects directly benefitting the Afghan people; and environmental and natural resource protection.

There are no OFAC-administered sanctions that generally prohibit the export or reexport of goods or services to Afghanistan, moving or sending money into and out of Afghanistan, or activities in Afghanistan, provided that such transactions or activities do not involve sanctioned individuals, entities, or property in which sanctioned individuals and entities have an interest. In all cases, authorized transactions and activities must comply with the terms and conditions set forth in the applicable General License. Notably, the General Licenses listed above explicitly do not authorize financial transfers to the Taliban or the Haqqani Network, other than for the purpose of effecting the payment of taxes, fees, or import duties, or the purchase or receipt of permits, licenses, or public utility services related to the activities specified. For more information, please see GLs 1718, and 19.

These GLs also help implement adopted resolution UNSCR 2615 (2021), which authorizes humanitarian assistance and other activities that support basic human needs as those terms are understood by the United Nations Security Council, as well as the processing and payment of funds, other financial assets or economic resources, and the provision of goods and services necessary to ensure the timely delivery of such assistance or to support such activities. 

This Resolution, drafted by the United States and unanimously adopted today by the 15 members of the UN Security Council, establishes a carveout in the UN 1988 sanctions regime to ensure urgently needed aid can reach the Afghan people. Specifically, UNSCR 2615 (2021) was intended to cover activities contemplated in the United Nations’ Transitional Engagement Framework (TEF) for Afghanistan, such as providing life-saving assistance; sustaining essential services; and preserving social investments and community-level systems essential to meeting basic human needs. The Resolution also requests periodic updates by the UN Emergency Relief Coordinator to ensure assistance is reaching the intended beneficiaries, not being diverted to the Taliban.

Concurrent with these actions, OFAC updated three Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) and issued six new FAQs. These FAQs provide clarity on the scope of GLs and address some of the questions that OFAC has received regarding its sanctions on the Taliban and the Haqqani Network. For more information, please see FAQs 928929931950951952953954, and 955.

OFAC also issued a humanitarian Fact Sheet, “Provision of Humanitarian Assistance to Afghanistan and Support for the Afghan People,” providing an overview of the abovementioned authorizations and guidance, along with other relevant authorizations and FAQs.

For transactions not otherwise authorized or exempt, OFAC considers license requests on a case-by-case basis and prioritizes applications, compliance questions, and other requests related to humanitarian activity. For more information regarding the scope of any sanctions program’s requirements or the applicability or scope of any humanitarian-related authorizations, please contact OFAC’s Sanction Compliance and Evaluation Division at (800) 540-6322 or (202) 622-2490, or by email at OFAC_Feedback@treasury.gov.

and State Departments:

Issuance of Additional General Licenses and Guidance in Support of Assistance to Afghanistan

PRESS STATEMENT

ANTONY J. BLINKEN, SECRETARY OF STATE

DECEMBER 22, 2021Share

The United States is working tirelessly with the international community to ensure humanitarian assistance and other essential support flows to the people of Afghanistan to support those in need. During Fiscal Year 2021, the United States provided nearly $474 million in humanitarian aid in Afghanistan and for Afghan refugees in the region making us the single largest provider of humanitarian assistance. We will continue to support efforts by our partners to scale up assistance and deliver necessary relief during this moment of particular need.

In line with that, the U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) issued three General Licenses today to facilitate the continued flow of vital assistance and support for the Afghan people. These licenses expand upon existing authorizations for the provision of humanitarian assistance and other activities that support basic human needs and enable broader support for the Afghan people consistent with Resolution 2615 (2021) adopted by the UN Security Council earlier today. This Resolution, drafted by the United States and unanimously adopted by the 15 members of the UN Security Council, establishes a carveout in the UN 1988 sanctions regime to ensure urgently needed aid can reach the Afghan people. The Resolution also requests periodic updates by the UN Emergency Relief Coordinator to ensure assistance is reaching the intended beneficiaries, not being diverted to the Taliban. UN sanctions are an important tool to respond to threats and human rights abuses, but we must make sure these sanctions do not hinder the delivery of urgently needed aid to the Afghan people.

While U.S. sanctions on the Taliban remain in place, OFAC has provided broad authorizations that ensure nongovernmental organizations, international organizations, and the U.S. government can continue to provide assistance and critical support to the most vulnerable Afghans. OFAC is also issuing a Fact Sheet that highlights all the relevant authorizations and guidance that facilitate the flow of humanitarian assistance, personal remittances, and other support to the Afghan people.

In addition, the United States will provide the people of Afghanistan one million additional COVID-19 vaccine doses through COVAX, bringing our total to 4.3 million doses. We stand with the Afghan people.

issued press releases. Also, Treasury Deputy Secretary Wally Adeyemo held a meeting with NGOs operating in Afghanistan, and the following readout of the meeting was published:

READOUTS

READOUT: Deputy Secretary of the Treasury Wally Adeyemo’s Meeting with Nongovernmental Organizations Operating in Afghanistan

December 22, 2021

WASHINGTON — Ahead of the release of Treasury’s General Licenses and guidance in support of humanitarian assistance in Afghanistan, Deputy Secretary of the Treasury Wally Adeyemo hosted a roundtable with over 100 representatives from more than 50 nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) to reinforce the U.S. government’s commitment to supporting humanitarian assistance in Afghanistan.

He heard directly from the NGOs operating on the ground in Afghanistan about their experiences delivering aid and the challenges they face. The Deputy Secretary explained Treasury’s commitment to supporting the Afghan people, its close partnership with NGOs, and answered questions about steps Treasury is taking to facilitate access to humanitarian assistance and aid and Treasury’s authorizations on topics such as education, donations of medical supplies, and the role of private sector financial institutions.

As the largest single provider of humanitarian assistance in Afghanistan, the U.S. is committed to ensuring that aid continues to flow to the Afghan people. While Treasury continues to uphold and enforce its economic sanctions on the Taliban, the department regularly engages with the NGO sector on its existing humanitarian authorizations and public guidance, as part of Treasury’s commitment to facilitating the flow of humanitarian assistance to areas affected by U.S. sanctions.

Links:

OFAC Notice

Fact Sheet

New FAQs: 950, 951, 952, 953, 954, 955

Amended FAQs: 928, 929, 931

Counter Terrorism General Licenses: 17, 18, 19

Press releases: Treasury, State

Deputy Secretary Adeyemo Meeting Readout

Categories: Afghanistan Sanctions Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) Guidance Humanitarian Aid Licenses OFAC Updates Taliban Terrorism

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