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Friday Sanctions-a-Rama! New Ethiopia E.O., G.L.s, FAQs… and some Iran and counter-terror designations

President Biden issued a new Executive Order “Imposing Sanctions on Certain Persons with Respect to the Humanitarian and Human Rights Crisis in Ethiopia”. It empowers the Treasury Secretary to sanction the following parties:

(a) to be responsible for or complicit in, or to have directly or indirectly engaged or attempted to engage in, any of the following:

(i) actions or policies that threaten the peace, security, or stability of Ethiopia, or that have the purpose or effect of expanding or extending the crisis in northern Ethiopia or obstructing a ceasefire or a peace process;

(ii) corruption or serious human rights abuse in or with respect to northern Ethiopia;

(iii) the obstruction of the delivery or distribution of, or access to, humanitarian assistance in or with respect to northern Ethiopia, including attacks on humanitarian aid personnel or humanitarian projects;

(iv) the targeting of civilians through the commission of acts of violence in or with respect to northern Ethiopia, including involving abduction, forced displacement, or attacks on schools, hospitals, religious sites, or locations where civilians are seeking refuge, or any conduct that would constitute a violation of international humanitarian law;

(v) planning, directing, or committing attacks in or with respect to northern Ethiopia against United Nations or associated personnel or African Union or associated personnel;

(vi) actions or policies that undermine democratic processes or institutions in Ethiopia; or

(vii) actions or policies that undermine the territorial integrity of Ethiopia;

(b) to be a military or security force that operates or has operated in northern Ethiopia on or after November 1, 2020;

(c) to be an entity, including any government entity or a political party, that has engaged in, or whose members have engaged in, activities that have contributed to the crisis in northern Ethiopia or have obstructed a ceasefire or peace process to resolve such crisis;

(d) to be a political subdivision, agency, or instrumentality of the Government of Ethiopia, the Government of Eritrea or its ruling People’s Front for Democracy and Justice, the Tigray People’s Liberation Front, the Amhara regional government, or the Amhara regional or irregular forces;

(e) to be a spouse or adult child of any sanctioned person;

(f) to be or have been a leader, official, senior executive officer, or member of the board of directors of any of the following, where the leader, official, senior executive officer, or director is responsible for or complicit in, or who has directly or indirectly engaged or attempted to engage in, any activity contributing to the crisis in northern Ethiopia:

(i) an entity, including a government entity or a military or security force, operating in northern Ethiopia during the tenure of the leader, official, senior executive officer, or director;

(ii) an entity that has, or whose members have, engaged in any activity contributing to the crisis in northern Ethiopia or obstructing a ceasefire or a peace process to resolve such crisis during the tenure of the leader, official, senior executive officer, or director; or

(iii) the Government of Ethiopia, the Government of Eritrea or its ruling People’s Front for Democracy and Justice, the Tigray People’s Liberation Front, the Amhara regional government, or the Amhara regional or irregular forces, on or after November 1, 2020;

(g) to have materially assisted, sponsored, or provided financial, material, or technological support for, or goods or services to or in support of, any sanctioned person; or

(h) to be owned or controlled by, or to have acted or purported to act for or on behalf of, directly or indirectly, any sanctioned person.

And it’s not just asset-freezes – these are the measures that can be imposed:

the Secretary of the Treasury shall take the following actions as necessary to implement the selected sanctions:

(A) block all property and interests in property of the sanctioned person that are in the United States, that hereafter come within the United States, or that are or hereafter come within the possession or control of any United States person, and provide that such property and interests in property may not be transferred, paid, exported, withdrawn, or otherwise dealt in;

(B) prohibit any United States person from investing in or purchasing significant amounts of equity or debt instruments of the sanctioned person;

(C) prohibit any United States financial institution from making loans or providing credit to the sanctioned person;

(D) prohibit any transactions in foreign exchange that are subject to the jurisdiction of the United States and in which the sanctioned person has any interest; or

(E) impose on the leader, official, senior executive officer, or director of the sanctioned person, or on persons performing similar functions and with similar authorities as such leader, official, senior executive officer, or director, any of the sanctions described in subsections (a)(i)(A)-(D) of this section that are applicable.

And…

the heads of the relevant executive departments and agencies, in consultation with the Secretary of the Treasury, shall take the following actions as necessary and appropriate to implement the sanctions selected by the Secretary of the Treasury:

(A) actions required to deny any specific license, grant, or any other specific permission or authority under any statute or regulation that requires the prior review and approval of the United States Government as a condition for the export or reexport of goods or technology to the sanctioned person; or

(B) actions required to deny a visa to and exclude from the United States any noncitizen whom the Secretary of the Treasury, in consultation with the Secretary of State, determines is a leader, official, senior executive officer, or director, or a shareholder with a controlling interest in, the sanctioned person.

The scope and detail of this program are impressive, to say the least.

Three General Licenses were issued.

The first authorizes official business of the UN and all its parts, the International Center for Settlement of Investment Disputes (ICSID), the Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency (MIGA), the African Development Bank Group, the Asian Development Bank, the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD), the Inter-American Development Bank Group (IBD Group) and any fund entities of these banks; the Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, and the African Union.

The second authorizes the following support of nongovernmental Organization activities:

(1) Activities to support humanitarian projects to meet basic human needs in Ethiopia or Eritrea, including drought and flood relief; food, nutrition, and medicine distribution; the provision ofhealth se1vices; assistance for vulnerable or displaced populations, including individuals with disabilities, the elderly, and smvivors ofsexual- ai1d gender-based violence; and environmental programs;

(2) Activities to support democracy building in Ethiopia or Eritrea, including activities to suppoli mle of law, citizen paiiicipation, government accountability and transparency, human rights and fundamental freedoms, access to info1mation, and civil society development projects;

(3) Activities to support education in Ethiopia or Eritrea, including combating illiteracy, increasing access to education, international exchanges, and assisting education refo1m projects;

(4) Activities to support non-commercial development projects in Ethiopia or Eritrea directly benefitting the people of such countries, including related to health, food security, and water and sanitation; and

(5) Activities to support enviromnental and natural resource protection in Ethiopia or Eritrea, including the preservation and protection of threatened or endangered species, responsible and transparent management of natural resources, and the remediation of pollution or other environmental damage.

And the first General License authorizes export/re-export of agricultural commodities, medicine, medical devices and their replacement parts and software updates for them.

And we have 6 new Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs):

922. What does Executive Order (E.O.) of September 17, 2021, “Imposing Sanctions on Certain Persons with Respect to the Humanitarian and Human Rights Crisis in Ethiopia,” do? Answer

E.O. of September 17, 2021 provides for the imposition of menu-based sanctions on foreign persons determined by the Secretary of the Treasury, in consultation with the Secretary of State, to meet certain criteria under the order, including foreign persons determined to be responsible for or complicit in actions or policies that expand or extend the ongoing crisis in northern Ethiopia or obstruct a ceasefire or peace process.  Section 1(a) of E.O. of September 17, 2021 provides the complete list of criteria for designation under the order. 

Section 2(a) of E.O. of September 17, 2021 lists the menu of prohibitions that can be imposed by the Secretary of the Treasury, in consultation with the Secretary of State, on a foreign person designated under the order. 

The prohibitions that may be selected include, among other things:  (1) blocking sanctions on all property and interests in property of the “sanctioned person” (as defined in E.O. of September 17, 2021), except for any entities owned, in whole or in part, directly or indirectly, by one or more sanctioned persons (unless the entity is itself a sanctioned person and the blocking sanctions have been selected); (2) a prohibition on any United States person investing in or purchasing significant amounts of equity or debt instruments of the sanctioned person; (3) a prohibition on any United States financial institution making loans or providing credit to the sanctioned person; (4) a prohibition on any transactions in foreign exchange that are subject to the jurisdiction of the United States and in which the sanctioned person has any interest; and (5) any of the above sanctions on the principal executive officer or officers of the sanctioned person, or on persons performing similar functions and with similar authorities.  Persons blocked pursuant to section 2(a)(i)(A) of E.O. of September 17, 2021 will appear on OFAC’s Specially Designated Nationals and Blocked Persons List (SDN List), while persons sanctioned pursuant to section 2(a)(i)(B) – (E) of E.O. of September 17, 2021 will appear on to the Non-SDN Menu-Based Sanctions List (NS-MBS List).

For the purposes of E.O. of September 17, 2021, the term “sanctioned person” means a foreign person (1) that has been determined by Secretary of the Treasury, in consultation with the Secretary of State, to meet any of the designation criteria described in section 1 of E.O. of September 17, 2021; and (2) for whom the Secretary of the Treasury, in consultation with the Secretary of State, has selected one or more of the sanctions set forth in Section 2(a) of E.O. of September 17, 2021 to impose on that foreign person.  Please see Section 7(f) of E.O. of September 17, 2021.

E.O. of September 17, 2021 is designed to impose costs on actors contributing to the conflict in northern Ethiopia while mitigating potential undue harm to the people of Ethiopia, including by exempting the official business of the U.S. government by its employees, grantees, and contractors from the prohibitions under E.O. of September 17, 2021, enabling their continued support of development activity, life-saving humanitarian assistance, and longer-term assistance to address basic needs of at-risk populations.

923. Do blocking sanctions imposed on persons pursuant to Executive Order (E.O.) of September 17, 2021, “Imposing Sanctions on Certain Persons with Respect to the Humanitarian and Human Rights Crisis in Ethiopia,” automatically apply to entities owned in whole or in part by sanctioned persons? Answer

No. Unless an entity is itself a sanctioned person (as defined in E.O. of September 17, 2021) and listed separately on OFAC’s Specially Designated Nationals and Blocked Persons List (SDN List), it is not blocked pursuant to E.O. of September 17, 2021. OFAC’s 50 Percent Rule does not apply to persons blocked solely pursuant to section 2(a)(i)(A) of E.O. of September 17, 2021.

924. Do non-blocking sanctions imposed on persons pursuant to Executive Order (E.O.) of September 17, 2021, “Imposing Sanctions on Certain Persons with Respect to the Humanitarian and Human Rights Crisis in Ethiopia,” automatically apply to entities owned in whole or in part by sanctioned persons?Answer

No. If a person is listed on OFAC’s Non-SDN Menu-Based Sanctions List (NS-MBS List) as subject to only one or more of the sanctions described in section 2(a)(i)(B) – (E) of E.O. of September 17, 2021, these non-blocking sanctions do not apply to an entity owned in whole or in part, individually or in the aggregate, directly or indirectly, by such sanctioned person, unless OFAC separately lists the entity on the NS-MBS List as subject to sanctions.

925. For purposes of Ethiopia General License (GL) 1, “Official Activities of Certain International Organizations and Other International Entities,” what organizations are included within the United Nations’ “Programmes, Funds, and Other Entities and Bodies, as well as its Specialized Agencies and Related Organizations”? Answer

For an organizational chart of the United Nations, which lists the Programmes, Funds, and Other Entities and Bodies, as well as the Specialized Agencies and Related Organizations covered by GL 1, please see the following page on the United Nations website: https://www.un.org/en/pdfs/un_system_chart.pdf.

926. What activities are authorized pursuant to Ethiopia General License (GL) 2, “Certain Transactions in Support of Nongovernmental Organizations’ Activities”? Answer

Ethiopia GL 2 authorizes certain transactions and activities involving nongovernmental organizations’ (NGOs) activities in Ethiopia or Eritrea, including: activities to support humanitarian projects and to meet basic human needs (such as, among other examples provided in GL 2, shelter and settlements assistance, water, sanitation, hygiene activities, and COVID-19 related assistance); activities to support democracy building (such as, among other examples provided in GL 2, activities to support conflict mitigation); activities to support education; activities to support non-commercial development projects directly benefiting the people of Ethiopia or Eritrea, including those related to health, food security, water and sanitation; and activities to support environmental and natural resource protection. Please see GL 2 for details.

927. Do non-U.S. persons risk exposure to U.S. sanctions for engaging in transactions and activities that would be authorized for U.S. persons pursuant to Executive Order (E.O.) of September 17, 2021, “Imposing Sanctions on Certain Persons with Respect to the Humanitarian and Human Rights Crisis in Ethiopia”?Answer

Non-U.S. persons, including nongovernmental organizations and foreign financial institutions, generally do not risk exposure to U.S. sanctions for engaging in, or facilitating transactions or payments for, activities that would be exempt or authorized for U.S. persons pursuant to Ethiopia GL 1, GL 2, or GL 3.

Finally, OFAC added the following persons:

ASADOLLAH, Hossein (Arabic: حسین اسداله) (a.k.a. ASSADOLLAH, Hossein; a.k.a. ASSADOLLAHI, Hossein), Iran; DOB 14 May 1983; nationality Iran; Additional Sanctions Information - Subject to Secondary Sanctions; Gender Male; Passport K34433062 (Iran) expires 02 Aug 2020; National ID No. 0063410176 (Iran) (individual) [SDGT] [IFSR] (Linked To: AMINI, Meghdad). 

HASHEMI, Seyed Morteza Minaye (Arabic: سید مرتضی مینای هاشمی), China; DOB 02 Mar 1984; POB Tehran, Iran; nationality Iran; Additional Sanctions Information - Subject to Secondary Sanctions; Gender Male; Passport T96361497 (Iran) expires 16 Oct 2022; National ID No. 0073496464 (Iran) (individual) [SDGT] [IFSR] (Linked To: HIZBALLAH; Linked To: ISLAMIC REVOLUTIONARY GUARD CORPS (IRGC)-QODS FORCE).

KAZEMI, Mohammad Reza (a.k.a. KAZEMI, Mohammad; a.k.a. KAZEMIAN, Mohammad Reza), Turkey; DOB 18 Sep 1981; nationality Iran; Additional Sanctions Information - Subject to Secondary Sanctions; Gender Male; Passport M49571636 (Iran) expires 03 Aug 2024; National ID No. 0075700247 (Iran) (individual) [SDGT] [IFSR] (Linked To: AMINI, Meghdad).

PURIYA, Mostafa (Arabic: مصطفی پوریا) (a.k.a. POORIA, Mostafa), Iran; DOB 25 Feb 1982; nationality Iran; Additional Sanctions Information - Subject to Secondary Sanctions; Gender Male; National ID No. 0074683217 (Iran) (individual) [SDGT] [IFSR] (Linked To: AMINI, Meghdad).

and entities:

BLACK DROP INTL CO., LIMITED (f.k.a. UNITED PETROCHEMIAL CO., LIMITED), Rm. 910, Block 1, No. 132-1 Liuhua Square, Dongfeng West Rd., Yuexiu District, Guangzhou, China; Unit C2, 12F, Block A, Universal Industrial Center, 19-25 Shan Mei Street, Fo Tan, Hong Kong, China; Additional Sanctions Information - Subject to Secondary Sanctions; C.R. No. 2513558 (Hong Kong); Business Registration Number 6753441400003185 (Hong Kong) [SDGT] [IFSR] (Linked To: HASHEMI, Seyed Morteza Minaye). 

CHINA 49 GROUP CO., LIMITED, Rm. 910, Block 1, No. 132-1 Liuhua Square, Dongfeng West Rd., Yuexiu District, Guangzhou, China; Unit C2, 12F, Block A, Universal Industrial Center, 19-25 Shan Mei Street, Fo Tan, Hong Kong, China; Additional Sanctions Information - Subject to Secondary Sanctions; C.R. No. 2512760 (Hong Kong); Business Registration Number 6752642100003186 (Hong Kong) [SDGT] [IFSR] (Linked To: HASHEMI, Seyed Morteza Minaye).

DAMINEH OPTIC LIMITED (Chinese Traditional: 大名額有限公司), Unit C2, 12/F., Block A, Universal Industrial Centre, 19-25 Shan Mei Street, Fo Tan, New Territories, Hong Kong, China; Additional Sanctions Information - Subject to Secondary Sanctions; C.R. No. 2001521 (Hong Kong) [SDGT] [IFSR] (Linked To: HASHEMI, Seyed Morteza Minaye).

PCA XIANG GANG LIMITED (Chinese Traditional: 披思埃香港有限公司), Unit C2, 12/F., Block A, Universal Industrial Centre, 19-25 Shan Mei Street, Fo Tan, New Territories, Hong Kong, China; Additional Sanctions Information - Subject to Secondary Sanctions; C.R. No. 1669316 (Hong Kong) [SDGT] [IFSR] (Linked To: HASHEMI, Seyed Morteza Minaye).

TAIWAN BE CHARM TRADING CO., LIMITED, Taiwan; Rm. 910, Block 1, No. 132-1 Liuhua Square, Dongfeng West Rd., Yuexiu District, Guangzhou, China; Unit C, 12F, Block A, Universal Industrial Center, 19-25 Shan Mei Street, Fo Tan, NT, Hong Kong, China; Additional Sanctions Information - Subject to Secondary Sanctions; C.R. No. 2429749 (Hong Kong); Business Registration Number 6669217800009171 (Hong Kong) [SDGT] [IFSR] (Linked To: HASHEMI, Seyed Morteza Minaye).

to its Iran-related and counter-terrorism sanctions, and the following persons:

AL-SHA'IR, Ali (a.k.a. AL-SHAER, Ali), Sultanah, Bint Jbeil, Nabatieh, Lebanon; DOB 26 Jan 1967; citizen Lebanon; Additional Sanctions Information - Subject to Secondary Sanctions Pursuant to the Hizballah Financial Sanctions Regulations; Gender Male; National ID No. 000013901514 (Lebanon) (individual) [SDGT] (Linked To: HIZBALLAH). 

AL-SHATTI, Jamal Husayn 'Abd 'Ali 'Abd-al-Rahim (a.k.a. ALSHATTI, Jamal Hussein Abd Ali; a.k.a. "ALSHUTTI, Jamal H A A A"), Kuwait; DOB 20 Aug 1964; nationality Kuwait; Additional Sanctions Information - Subject to Secondary Sanctions Pursuant to the Hizballah Financial Sanctions Regulations; Gender Male; Passport 004465264 (Kuwait) expires 13 Dec 2021; National ID No. 264082000213 (Kuwait) (individual) [SDGT] (Linked To: HIZBALLAH).

DAMIRCHILU, Mohammad Ali (Arabic: محمدعلی دمیرچی‌لو), 19 Beharistan Alley, No. 9, Unit 10, North Jannat Abad, Tehran, Iran; DOB 24 May 1992; nationality Iran; Additional Sanctions Information - Subject to Secondary Sanctions; Gender Male; National ID No. 0014634945 (Iran) (individual) [SDGT] (Linked To: QASIR, Ali).

DAMIRCHILU, Samaneh (Arabic: سمانه دمیرچی‌لو) (a.k.a. DAMIRCHILOO, Samaneh), Golbarg 4 Street, Number 5, First Floor, Tehran, Iran; DOB 26 Aug 1990; nationality Iran; Additional Sanctions Information - Subject to Secondary Sanctions; Gender Female; National ID No. 0012457914 (Iran) (individual) [SDGT] (Linked To: QASIR, Ali).

HADWAN, Hasib Muhammad (a.k.a. HADWAN, Hasib; a.k.a. "ZAYN, Hajj"; a.k.a. "ZAYN, Hajj Mustafa"; a.k.a. "ZEIN, Hajj"), Lebanon; DOB 1959; POB Hazin, Lebanon; nationality Lebanon; Additional Sanctions Information - Subject to Secondary Sanctions Pursuant to the Hizballah Financial Sanctions Regulations; Gender Male; National ID No. 2288073 (Lebanon) (individual) [SDGT] (Linked To: HIZBALLAH).

ISMAIL, Talib Husayn Ali Jarak, Block 8, Street 20, House No. 33, Jabriya, Kuwait; Street 21, Salem Al Mubarak Avenue, Block 20, Building 13, Salmiya, Kuwait; PO Box 3390, Safat 13034, Kuwait City, Kuwait; PO Box 126, Safat 13002, Kuwait City, Kuwait; Block 8, Street 103, Building 33, Apartment 33, Jabriya, Kuwait; Mubarak Al Kabir, Darwaza abdul Razak Square, Kuwait City, Kuwait; DOB 30 Apr 1956; POB Kuwait City, Kuwait; nationality Kuwait; Gender Male (individual) [SDGT] (Linked To: HIZBALLAH).

SONG, Jing (a.k.a. SONG, Crystal), Guangzhou City, Guangdong Province, China; DOB 03 Aug 1969; POB Mudanjiang, China; nationality China; Additional Sanctions Information - Subject to Secondary Sanctions; Gender Female; Passport E24963042 (China); National ID No. 231004196908031226 (China) (individual) [SDGT] (Linked To: HASHEMI, Seyed Morteza Minaye).

YAN, Su Xuan (Chinese Simplified: 颜素炫) (a.k.a. YAN, Suxuan; a.k.a. YAN, Yen), Room 902, Building 5, 12 Tangjing Road, Tangxia, Baiyun District, Guangzhou City, China; Taiwan; DOB 08 Oct 1983; POB Guangdong, China; nationality China; Additional Sanctions Information - Subject to Secondary Sanctions; Gender Female; Passport EA4917489 (China) expires 20 Jun 2027 (individual) [SDGT] (Linked To: HASHEMI, Seyed Morteza Minaye).

YAZDANPARAST, Omid, Tehran, Iran; DOB 14 Jul 1984; POB Tehran, Iran; nationality Iran; Additional Sanctions Information - Subject to Secondary Sanctions; Gender Male; National ID No. 0450190986 (Iran) (individual) [SDGT] (Linked To: QASIR, Ali).

and entities:

HEMERA INFOTECH FZCO (Arabic: همیرا إنفوتیك ش.م.ح), Dubai, United Arab Emirates; Additional Sanctions Information - Subject to Secondary Sanctions; Commercial Registry Number 11437558 (United Arab Emirates); License 4041 (United Arab Emirates) [SDGT] (Linked To: ASADOLLAH, Hossein). 

VICTORY SOMO GROUP HK LIMITED, 19/F., No. 3 Lockhart Road, Wanchai, Hong Kong, China; Additional Sanctions Information - Subject to Secondary Sanctions; C.R. No. 2700467 (Hong Kong) [SDGT] (Linked To: SONG, Jing).

YUMMY BE CHARM TRADING HK LIMITED, 19/F., No. 3 Lockhart Road, Wanchai, Hong Kong, China; Additional Sanctions Information - Subject to Secondary Sanctions; C.R. No. 2700472 (Hong Kong) [SDGT] (Linked To: SONG, Jing).

to its counter-terrorism sanctions. And the following counter-terror listing:

QASIR, Ali (a.k.a. GHASIR, Ali; a.k.a. GHASSIR, Ali; a.k.a. KASSIR, Ali; a.k.a. QASIR, 'Ali), Iran; DOB 29 Jul 1992; POB Deir Kanoun El Nahr, Lebanon; nationality Lebanon; Additional Sanctions Information - Subject to Secondary Sanctions; Gender Male; Passport RL 3367620 (Lebanon) expires 28 Aug 2020 (individual) [SDGT] (Linked To: QASEMI, Rostam). -to- QASIR, Ali (a.k.a. GHASEMI, Naser; a.k.a. GHASIR, Ali; a.k.a. GHASSIR, Ali; a.k.a. KASSIR, Ali; a.k.a. QASIR, 'Ali), Iran; DOB 29 Jul 1992; alt. DOB 29 Jul 1990; POB Deir Kanoun El Nahr, Lebanon; nationality Lebanon; Additional Sanctions Information - Subject to Secondary Sanctions; alt. Additional Sanctions Information - Subject to Secondary Sanctions Pursuant to the Hizballah Financial Sanctions Regulations; Gender Male; Passport RL 3367620 (Lebanon) expires 28 Aug 2020 (individual) [SDGT] (Linked To: QASEMI, Rostam; Linked To: HIZBALLAH). 

was updated.

And Treasury issued press releases – for the Ethiopia sanctions:

PRESS RELEASES

United States Issues New Executive Order with Respect to the Humanitarian and Human Rights Crisis in Ethiopia

September 17, 2021

U.S. Commits to Free Flow of Humanitarian Assistance in Northern Ethiopia Conflict

WASHINGTON — In response to the growing conflict and humanitarian and human rights crisis in northern Ethiopia, which has threatened the peace, security, and stability of Ethiopia and the greater Horn of Africa region, President Biden signed an Executive Order (E.O.), “Imposing Sanctions on Certain Persons with Respect to the Humanitarian and Human Rights Crisis in Ethiopia.”  The E.O. declares a national emergency with respect to the crisis and provides the Secretary of the Treasury, in consultation with the Secretary of State, with authorities to impose a range of targeted sanctions on persons determined, among other things, to be responsible for or complicit in actions or policies that expand or extend the ongoing crisis or obstruct a ceasefire or peace process in northern Ethiopia or commit serious human rights abuse. 

“Together, with allies, partners, and international organizations, the United States calls on all parties to enter into negotiations to end the conflict.  This conflict has created a widespread humanitarian crisis and threatens the stability of Ethiopia,” said Deputy Secretary of the Treasury Wally Adeyemo.  “The Treasury Department is prepared to employ the range of targeted actions to hold accountable anyone contributing to the deepening of this crisis. The negotiated end of the conflict will set the stage for the United States and international partners to reengage in our efforts to support Ethiopia’s reforms to boost economic growth and job creation.” 

The E.O. authorizes targeting of actors contributing to the crisis in northern Ethiopia and is not directed at the people of Ethiopia, Eritrea, or the greater Horn of Africa region.  Treasury remains committed to ensuring that U.S. sanctions do not limit the ability of civilians located in Ethiopia and the region to receive humanitarian support from the international community.  As part of this commitment, concurrent with the issuance of the new E.O., Treasury issued three general licenses (GLs), which authorize official activities of certain international organizations and other international entities, certain transactions in support of nongovernmental organizations’ (NGOs) activities, and certain transactions related to the exportation or reexportation of agricultural commodities, food, medicine, and medical items.  For more information, please see Ethiopia GLs 12, and 3.

“Treasury is committed to facilitating the flow of humanitarian assistance to the people of Ethiopia.  Treasury will continue to work with financial institutions, international organizations, and the NGO community to ease the flow of necessary resources to the people in need across Ethiopia and throughout the greater Horn of Africa region,” said Deputy Secretary Adeyemo.

Furthermore, today Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) issued six Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs).  These FAQs provide additional clarity and guidance regarding the non-application of OFAC’s 50 Percent Rule to the property and interests in property of persons blocked pursuant to this E.O., as well as additional information on the activities authorized by Ethiopia GLs 1, 2, and 3.  For more information, please see FAQs 922923924925926, and 927.

View information from the White House on the new E.O.

and for the counter-terror designations:

PRESS RELEASES

Treasury Sanctions International Financial Networks Supporting Terrorism

September 17, 2021

WASHINGTON — Today, the U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) is designating members of a network of Lebanon- and Kuwait-based financial conduits that fund Hizballah.  Additionally, OFAC is designating members of an international network of financial facilitators and front companies that operate in support of Hizballah and Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps-Qods Force (IRGC-QF).  Together, these networks have laundered tens of millions of dollars through regional financial systems and conducted currency exchange operations and trades in gold and electronics for the benefit of both Hizballah and the IRGC-QF.  Hizballah, with the support of the IRGC-QF, uses the revenues generated by these networks to fund terrorist activities, as well as to perpetuate instability in Lebanon and throughout the region. 

“Hizballah and the IRGC-QF continue to exploit the international financial system to finance acts of terrorism,” said Office of Foreign Assets Control Director Andrea M. Gacki.  “The United States will not hesitate to take action to disrupt networks that provide financial support to Hizballah and IRGC-QF.”

Today’s action is being taken pursuant to the counterterrorism authority Executive Order (E.O.) 13224, as amended.  Hizballah was designated pursuant to E.O. 13224 on October 31, 2001.  The IRGC-QF was designated pursuant to E.O. 13224, as amended, in 2007 for supporting numerous terrorist groups.

Hizballah’s Financiers in Kuwait and Lebanon

Today’s actions underscore the direct ties between Hizballah’s global financial network and terrorist activities.  Hizballah continues to exploit the legitimate commercial sector for financial and material support, which enables the group to carry out acts of terrorism and degrade Lebanon’s political institutions.  The designations of the individuals and entities described below demonstrate Treasury’s ongoing efforts to target Hizballah and the essential support provided to it by Iran’s IRGC-QF.

Hasib Muhammad Hadwan, also known as Hajj Zayn, is a senior official in Hizballah’s General Secretariat.  He is subordinate to Hizballah’s Secretary General, Hassan Nasrallah, and is responsible for raising funds from donors and businessmen outside Lebanon.  OFAC designated Hassan Nasrallah on May 16, 2018, pursuant to E.O. 13224, as amended, as the leader of Hizballah.  Ali al-Sha’ir is Hadwan’s office manager and has been accepting financial contributions on behalf of Hizballah since 2000.

Hasib Muhammad Hadwan is being designated pursuant to E.O. 13224, as amended, for having acted or purported to act for or on behalf of, directly or indirectly, Hizballah.  Ali al-Sha’ir is being designated pursuant to E.O. 13224, as amended, for having materially assisted, sponsored, or provided financial, material, or technological support for, or goods or services to or in support of, Hizballah.    

Talib Husayn ‘Ali Jarak Ismai’l coordinated the transfer of millions of dollars to Hizballah from Kuwait through Jamal Husayn ‘Abd ‘Ali ‘Abd-al-Rahim al-Shatti.  Talib Husayn ‘Ali Jarak Ismai’l also travelled to Lebanon to meet with Hizballah officials to donate money to the group. 

Both Talib Husayn ‘Ali Jarak Ismai’l and Jamal Husayn ‘Abd ‘Ali ‘Abd-al-Rahim al-Shatti are being designated pursuant to E.O. 13224, as amended, for having materially assisted, sponsored, or provided financial, material, or technological support for, or goods or services to or in support of, Hizballah.

Hizballah and IRGC-QF Currency Exchange, Gold, and Electronics Sales Network

IRGC-QF and Hizballah financial facilitators Meghdad Amini and Ali Qasir helm a network of nearly 20 individuals and front companies, located in multiple countries and jurisdictions, that facilitates the movement and sale of tens of millions of dollars’ worth of gold, electronics, and foreign currency in support of Hizballah and the IRGC-QF.  Amini was designated pursuant to E.O. 13224 in May 2018 for his role in helping the IRGC-QF transfer cash out of Iran to the UAE for conversion into U.S. dollars.  Qasir was previously designated in September 2019 pursuant to E.O. 13224, as amended, for acting for or on behalf of IRGC-QF official Rostam Ghasemi, who oversaw a vast network involved in oil sales on behalf of the IRGC-QF.  Qasir, a Hizballah financial facilitator, works with Hizballah officials to manage the group’s bank accounts in Iran and collaborates with IRGC-QF officials to manage financial transactions in the interest of both Hizballah and the IRGC-QF.  He has helped transfer hundreds of millions of dollars for the benefit of Hizballah and Iran.  Qasir continued to work with Ghasemi to arrange the sale of Iranian oil to foreign customers in order to generate revenue for the IRGC-QF and Hizballah following the pair’s 2019 designations.

Qasir is being designated today pursuant to E.O. 13224, as amended, for having acted or purported to act for or on behalf of, directly or indirectly, Hizballah.

Amini and Qasir are aided in their efforts by a team of trusted subordinates.  Omid YazdanparastMohammad Ali Damirchilu, and Samaneh Damirchilu facilitate the smuggling of gold and currency from Iran to Turkey via commercial flights operated by U.S.-designated Iranian airline Mahan Air.  Mohammad Reza Kazemi facilitates the gold sales in Turkey.  Once gold is sold, the proceeds are returned to Iran through the same process, whereupon they are transferred to Amini and Qasir.  Samaneh Damirchilu has also worked with Qasir to facilitate the sale of Iranian oil to foreign buyers.

Yazdanparast and Samaneh Damirchilu are being designated pursuant to E.O. 13224, as amended, for having materially assisted, sponsored, or provided financial, material, or technological support for, or goods or services to or in support of, Ali Qasir.  Mohammad Reza Kazemi is being designated pursuant to E.O. 13224, as amended, for having materially assisted, sponsored, or provided financial, material, or technological support for, or goods or services to or in support of, Meghdad Amini.  Mohammad Ali Damirchilu is being designated pursuant to E.O. 13224, as amended, for having acted or purported to act for or on behalf of, directly or indirectly, Ali Qasir.

Mostafa Puriya and Hossein Asadollah sell electronics on behalf of this network in the UAE through the Dubai-based company Hemera Infotech FZCO.  Puriya and Asadollah are being designated pursuant to E.O. 13224, as amended, for having materially assisted, sponsored, or provided financial, material, or technological support for, or goods or services to or in support of, Meghdad Amini.  Hemera Infotech FZCO is being designated pursuant to E.O. 13224, as amended, for being owned, controlled, or directed by, directly or indirectly, Hossein Asadollah.

China-based businessman Morteza Minaye Hashemi has used his access to the international financial system to launder vast sums of money for the IRGC-QF and Hizballah.  In coordination with Mohammad Reza Kazemi, Hashemi has laundered tens of millions of dollars for the IRGC-QF and Hizballah through foreign currency conversions and gold sales.  Hashemi has also been involved in financial transfers associated with Mohammadreza Khedmati, another IRGC-QF financial facilitator designated in May 2018 alongside Amini for providing support to the IRGC-QF.

Hashemi is being designated pursuant to E.O. 13224, as amended, for having materially assisted, sponsored, or provided financial, material, or technological support for, or goods or services to or in support of, the IRGC-QF and Hizballah.  

Hashemi controls multiple companies based out of Hong Kong and mainland China.  Hashemi is aided by People’s Republic of China nationals Yan Su Xuan and Song Jing who, at the direction of Hashemi, have helped him establish bank accounts and serve as straw owners for his companies. Yan Su Xuan, on Hashemi’s behalf, has also purchased U.S.-origin, dual-use products for onward shipment to Iran.

PCA Xiang Gang LimitedDamineh Optic LimitedChina 49 Group Co.LimitedTaiwan Be Charm Trading Co.Limited, and Black Drop Intl Co., Limited are being designated pursuant to E.O. 13224, as amended, for being owned, controlled, or directed by, directly or indirectly, Hashemi.

Victory Somo Group (HK) Limited and Yummy Be Charm Trading (HK) Limited are being designated pursuant to E.O. 13224, as amended, for being owned, controlled, or directed by, directly or indirectly, Song Jing.  Hashemi maintains significant oversight over the funds and administration of these two companies.

Sanctions Implications

As a result of today’s action, all property and interests in property of the individuals and entities named above, and any entities that are owned, directly or indirectly, 50 percent or more by them, individually, or with other blocked persons, that are in the United States or in control of a U.S. person must be blocked and reported to OFAC.  Unless authorized by a general or specific license issued by OFAC or otherwise exempt, OFAC’s regulations generally prohibit all transactions by U.S. persons or within the United States (including transactions transiting the United States) that involve any property or interests in property of designated or otherwise blocked persons.

Furthermore, engaging in certain transactions with the persons designated today entails risk of secondary sanctions pursuant to E.O. 13224, as amended.  Several individuals being designated today are subject to the Hizballah Financial Sanctions Regulations, which implement the Hizballah International Financing Prevention Act of 2015, as amended by the Hizballah International Financing Prevention Amendments Act of 2018.  Pursuant to these authorities, OFAC can prohibit or impose strict conditions on the opening or maintaining in the United States of a correspondent account or a payable-through account by a foreign financial institution that either knowingly conducted or facilitated any significant transaction on behalf of a Specially Designated Global Terrorist or, among other things, knowingly facilitates a significant transaction for Hizballah or certain persons designated for their connection to Hizballah.

For information concerning the process for seeking removal from an OFAC list, including the Specially Designated Nationals and Blocked Persons List (SDN List), please refer to OFAC’s Frequently Asked Question 897 at https://home.treasury.gov/policy-issues/financial-sanctions/faqs/897. Additional information regarding sanctions programs administered by OFAC can be found at https://home.treasury.gov/policy-issues/financial-sanctions/sanctions-programs-and-country-information.

And the White House issued a Fact Sheet on the Ethiopian sanctions:

BRIEFING ROOM

FACT SHEET: Biden-⁠Harris Administration Actions in Response to Ongoing Crisis in Northern Ethiopia

SEPTEMBER 17, 2021•STATEMENTS AND RELEASES

“My Administration will continue to press for a negotiated ceasefire, an end to abuses of innocent civilians, and humanitarian access to those in need.”  

– President Biden

Today, President Biden is taking further steps to respond to the ongoing conflict in northern Ethiopia.  This conflict has sparked one of the worst humanitarian and human rights crises in the world, with over 5 million people requiring humanitarian assistance and nearly one million living in famine-like conditions. 

The parties to the conflict – including Ethiopian National Defense Forces (ENDF), Eritrean Defense Forces (EDF), the Tigray People’s Liberation Front (TPLF), and Amhara regional forces – have committed human rights abuses against civilians.  There have been widespread reports of armed actors committing brutal acts of murder, rape, and other sexual violence against civilian populations.  The UN Population Fund has estimated that tens of thousands of women and girls in northern Ethiopia will need medical, mental health, psychosocial, and legal services to begin to rebuild their lives following conflict-related sexual and gender-based violence.

Together with allies, partners, and international organizations, the United States calls on all parties to end hostilities, to allow and facilitate unimpeded humanitarian access, to ensure accountability for human rights abuses, and to enter into an inclusive dialogue to preserve the unity of the Ethiopian state.  We also call on the Ethiopian government and the TPLF to begin discussions without preconditions to achieve a negotiated ceasefire and a political resolution of the conflict.  In remarks to the UN Security Council in August, the UN Secretary-General was clear: “All parties must recognize a simple truth: there is no military solution.” 

The United States is committed to helping Ethiopia address the ongoing challenges, building on the deep and historic ties between our two countries.  At President Biden’s direction, the United States is actively pursuing measures to promote an end to the fighting, protect human rights, and help meet humanitarian needs:

Sanctioning Those Prolonging the Conflict and Perpetrating Abuses

Today, President Biden signed an Executive Order (E.O.) establishing a new sanctions regime that gives the U.S. Department of the Treasury (Treasury), working with the U.S. Department of State (State), the authority to hold accountable those in the Ethiopian government, the Eritrean government, the TPLF, and the Amhara regional government who are responsible for, or complicit in, prolonging the conflict, obstructing humanitarian access, or preventing a ceasefire.  Treasury is prepared to take action under this E.O. to impose targeted sanctions against those responsible for the ongoing crisis. 

While imposing sanctions under this E.O., the United States will take measures to mitigate unintended effects on the people of Ethiopia and the wider region.  The United States will seek to ensure personal remittances to non-sanctioned persons, humanitarian assistance to at-risk populations, and longer-term assistance programs and commercial activities that address basic human needs continue to flow to Ethiopia and the greater Horn of Africa region through legitimate and transparent channels. 

This Executive Order follows sanctions and visa restrictions the United States has already imposed.  In August 2021, the Department of Treasury sanctioned General Filipos Woldeyohannes, the Chief of Staff of the Eritrean Defense Forces, pursuant to E.O. 13818, which builds upon and implements the Global Magnitsky Human Rights Accountability Act.   In May 2021, Secretary of State Antony Blinken announced a policy under Section 212(a)(3)(C) of the Immigration and Nationality Act imposing visa restrictions on individuals believed to be responsible for, or complicit in, undermining resolution of the crisis in Tigray. 

The United States has imposed defense trade restrictions for exports to Ethiopia amid the ongoing conflict and reported human rights abuses.  The United States urges other countries to implement similar measures to stop the flow of weapons to any parties to the conflict and support a negotiated ceasefire.

The actions of those involved in the conflict will determine whether the U.S. government imposes sanctions.  The United States is prepared to impose sanctions if there is not progress toward a resolution of the conflict.  If there is progress, the United States is prepared to work with the international community to mobilize critical assistance for Ethiopia to recover from this conflict, reorganize its significant debt, and revitalize its economy.

Facilitating Ceasefire Negotiations and a Political Resolution of the Conflict

Working with allies and partners, the United States is committed to supporting the Ethiopian government and the TPLF to negotiate a sustainable ceasefire and a peaceful resolution of the conflict.  At the Carbis Bay Summit in June, G7 leaders urged “an immediate cessation of hostilities” and pursuit of a peaceful resolution to the crisis.  In August, a majority of UN Security Council members publicly backed the Secretary-General’s call for the parties to “immediately end hostilities without pre-conditions and seize the opportunity to negotiate a lasting ceasefire.”  More broadly, the United States encourages an inclusive and credible national dialogue in which all Ethiopians have a say in their shared future.

In March 2021, President Biden sent Senator Coons and a high-level delegation to meet with Ethiopian Prime Minister Ahmed Abiy and to offer to help peacefully resolve the conflict.  In April 2021, the Administration appointed Ambassador Jeffrey Feltman as U.S. Special Envoy for the Horn of Africa.  Special Envoy Feltman is leading a diplomatic effort to address the interlinked crises of the region.  To that end, the United States will continue to work closely with our partners in the region, including the chairman of the Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD), Abdallah Hamdok, and welcomes the African Union Commission’s appointment of former Nigerian President Olusegun Obasanjo as its High Representative for the Horn of Africa. 

The United States has also provided support for local-level efforts in Ethiopia to promote dialogue and reconciliation across political and ethnic divisions. 

Investigating and Documenting Human Rights Abuses

Accountability for atrocities committed during the conflict is necessary for peace and will help deter a recurrence of violence.  The United States is committed to supporting the investigation and documentation of human rights abuses in the ongoing conflict in order to lay the groundwork for future accountability efforts. 

The United States has provided financial support for the ongoing joint investigation by the UN Office of the High Commissioner of Human Rights (OHCHR) and the Ethiopian Human Rights Commission.  The United States cosponsored the European Union’s resolution at the UN Human Rights Council in July to strengthen this investigation.  The United States conveyed further support for OHCHR’s work at the Human Rights Council’s Interactive Dialogue on Ethiopia on September 13.

The United States supports the ongoing commission of inquiry by the African Commission of Human and People’s Rights.  The United States is also committed to and planning financial support for a supplemental, third-party-led human rights documentation initiative focused on transitional justice and ensuring accountability for atrocities committed by all parties in the ongoing conflict.

Supporting the People of Ethiopia

Ethiopia has made significant development gains in recent years, but the conflict threatens that progress and the well-being of the Ethiopian people.  The United States has a long record of partnering with the people of Ethiopia to promote development, and while we have imposed restrictions on certain economic and security assistance as a result of the human rights situation, we continue to provide significant aid to the Ethiopian people.  Ethiopia remains one of the largest recipients of U.S. humanitarian and development assistance in the world, spanning areas such as agriculture, health, clean water, food and nutrition security, basic education, and support for women and girls.  This assistance benefits all regions of Ethiopia.  

The United States is the single largest single donor of humanitarian aid to Ethiopia, providing nearly $900 million in total humanitarian assistance over the past year.  USAID has provided nearly 65% of all donor contributions to date to the humanitarian response in northern Ethiopia.  In August 2021, USAID Administrator Samantha Power visited Ethiopia and Ethiopian refugee camps in neighboring Sudan and committed to sustain ongoing assistance.

The United States is also committed to helping Ethiopia to address the COVID-19 pandemic.  The United States has provided more than $185 million in COVID-19 related assistance to Ethiopia in addition to the donation of nearly 2 million COVID-19 vaccine doses delivered to date.  This support has included efforts to strengthen local health system capacity for infection prevention control; reduce morbidity and mortality through strengthening COVID-19 case management; accelerate widespread and equitable access to and delivery of safe and effective COVID-19 vaccinations; and mitigate the secondary humanitarian impacts of COVID-19 through emergency food assistance to affected populations.

Listening to and Partnering with U.S. Stakeholders, including Ethiopian American Leaders

The Administration is committed to building upon the deep and historic ties between Ethiopia and the United States.  The United States benefits tremendously from a large and vibrant Ethiopian-American community.  We celebrate the rich contributions that individuals with ties to the Horn of Africa make to all aspects of our nation, including in academia, the arts, business, healthcare, sports, and more.  The Administration is reaching out and creating opportunities for dialogue with Ethiopian-American leaders and stakeholders.  We welcome their unique ideas and contributions to promote understanding and healing across ethnic and political lines as we seek to achieve the shared goal of a united, peaceful Ethiopia.

“The United States has a deep and long-lasting commitment to the people of the Horn of Africa.  We will continue to speak out against violence and inhumane treatment of any group of people, and we will continue our support for addressing humanitarian needs in the region.  We believe Ethiopia, a great and diverse nation, can overcome its current divisions and resolve the ongoing conflict, beginning with a negotiated ceasefire.  Building peace will not be easy, but it can and must begin now with dialogue and by seeking unity in our common humanity.

President Biden, September 10, 2021

And the President issued a statement on the Executive Order:

BRIEFING ROOM

Statement by President Joseph R. Biden, Jr. on the Executive Order Regarding the Crisis in Ethiopia

SEPTEMBER 17, 2021•STATEMENTS AND RELEASES

The ongoing conflict in northern Ethiopia is a tragedy causing immense human suffering and threatens the unity of the Ethiopian state. Nearly one million people are living in famine-like conditions, and millions more face acute food insecurity as a direct consequence of the violence. Humanitarian workers have been blocked, harassed, and killed. I am appalled by the reports of mass murder, rape, and other sexual violence to terrorize civilian populations.

The United States is determined to push for a peaceful resolution of this conflict, and we will provide full support to those leading mediation efforts, including the African Union High Representative for the Horn of Africa Olusegun Obasanjo. We fully agree with United Nations and African Union leaders: there is no military solution to this crisis.

I join leaders from across Africa and around the world in urging the parties to the conflict to halt their military campaigns respect human rights, allow unhindered humanitarian access, and come to the negotiating table without preconditions. Eritrean forces must withdraw from Ethiopia. A different path is possible but leaders must make the choice to pursue it.

My Administration will continue to press for a negotiated ceasefire, an end to abuses of innocent civilians, and humanitarian access to those in need. The Executive Order I signed today establishes a new sanctions regime that will allow us to target those responsible for, or complicit in, prolonging the conflict in Ethiopia, obstructing humanitarian access, or preventing a ceasefire. It provides the Department of the Treasury with the necessary authority to hold accountable those in the Government of Ethiopia, Government of Eritrea, the Tigray People’s Liberation Front, and Amhara regional government, among others, that continue to pursue conflict over negotiations to the detriment of the Ethiopian people.

The United States remains committed to supporting the people of Ethiopia and to strengthening the historic ties between our countries.

These sanctions are not directed at the people of Ethiopia or Eritrea, but rather the individuals and entities perpetrating the violence and driving a humanitarian disaster. We provide Ethiopia with more humanitarian and development assistance than does any other country benefitting all of its regions. We will continue to work with our partners to address basic needs of at-risk populations in Ethiopia and the greater Horn of Africa.

Not to be left out, the State Department also issued press releases about the Ethiopia action:

Issuance of New Executive Order Establishing Sanctions Related to the Crisis in Ethiopia

PRESS STATEMENT

ANTONY J. BLINKEN, SECRETARY OF STATE

SEPTEMBER 17, 2021Share

In the midst of ongoing violence, abuses against civilians, and growing humanitarian plight in Ethiopia, President Biden today signed an Executive Order (E.O.) establishing a new sanctions regime in response to the crisis. With it, the United States will be able to impose financial sanctions on individuals and entities in connection with the conflict, including those responsible for threatening peace and stability, obstructing humanitarian access or progress toward a ceasefire, or committing serious human rights abuses. Designated individuals are also subject to visa restrictions. This conflict has sparked one of the worst humanitarian crises in the world, with more than five million people requiring assistance, of which over 900,000 are living in famine conditions. This new tool underscores our resolve to use every appropriate tool at our disposal to bring relief to the long-suffering people of the region.

For too long, the Government of Ethiopia, the Government of Eritrea, the Amhara regional government, and the Tigray People’s Liberation Front (TPLF) have failed to stop fighting and invest in diplomacy required to solve the ongoing crisis. Instead, violence has escalated and spread, and human rights abuses and obstruction of humanitarian access continue. The Administration, in concert with our international partners, including in the region, has employed a range of diplomatic tools. Most recently, the United States designated Eritrean Defense Forces (EDF) Chief of Staff General Filipos Woldeyohannes under the Global Magnitsky sanctions authority in connection with serious human rights abuses committed by the EDF in Ethiopia. In May, we also announced a visa restriction policy on the issuance of visas for individuals responsible for, or complicit in, undermining the resolution of the crisis in Tigray.

The United States calls on the Ethiopian government and the TPLF to cease ongoing hostilities and enter into ceasefire negotiations immediately and without preconditions. Talks to achieve a negotiated ceasefire should lead to a broader dialogue to find a durable political solution to the conflict. Eritrean forces should immediately and permanently withdraw from Ethiopia. If the parties take immediate steps in this regard, the United States is prepared to delay imposition of sanctions and focus on supporting a negotiated process.

Absent clear and concrete progress toward a negotiated ceasefire and an end to abuses – as well as unhindered humanitarian access to those Ethiopians who are suffering – the United States will designate imminently specific leaders, organizations, and entities under this new sanctions regime. Any sanctions imposed under this new authority would target those responsible for or complicit in actions or policies that are prolonging the conflict in northern Ethiopia, obstructing humanitarian access and a ceasefire, or committing serious human rights abuses. We have taken a series of steps to help ensure legitimate humanitarian assistance (including COVID-19 related assistance), as well as personal remittances, food, and medicine continue to reach the Ethiopian and Eritrean people and that the activities of international organizations and non-governmental organizations in Ethiopia and Eritrea can proceed.

Today’s action demonstrates that the United States will continue to use all appropriate tools at our disposal to end the conflict.

and the counter-terror one:

The United States Imposes Sanctions on International Networks Supporting Terrorism

PRESS STATEMENT

ANTONY J. BLINKEN, SECRETARY OF STATE

SEPTEMBER 17, 2021Share

The United States has designated Lebanon- and Kuwait-based members of a financial network that funds Hizballah, as well as members of an international network of financial facilitators and front companies that operate in support of Hizballah and Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps-Qods Force (IRGC-QF). Together, these networks have laundered tens of millions of dollars through regional financial systems and conducted currency exchange operations and trade in gold and electronics for the benefit of both Hizballah and the IRGC-QF. This action is being taken pursuant to the counterterrorism authority within Executive Order 13224, as amended.

Hizballah uses revenues generated by these networks to fund terrorist activities and to perpetuate instability in Lebanon and throughout the region. The United States will not relent in targeting these networks, and we will continue to take actions to disrupt their activities.

Hizballah is increasingly looking for additional sources of revenue to bolster its coffers. We call on governments around the world to take steps to ensure Hizballah and other terrorist groups do not exploit their territory and financial institutions.

Links:

OFAC Notice

Executive Order

General Licenses: 1, 2, 3

New FAQs: 922, 923, 924, 925, 926, 927

Treasury Press Releases: Ethiopia, Terrorism

State Department Press Releases: Ethiopia, Terrorism

White House Fact Sheet

Presidential Statement

Categories: Ethiopia Sanctions Executive Orders Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) Guidance Humanitarian Aid Iranian Sanctions Licenses OFAC Updates Sanctions Lists Terrorism

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