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Sweden Explains It All: EU Liberia sanctions

This is the historical background on the sanctions against Liberia:

The United Nations Security Council introduced a series of sanctions against Liberia during the civil war in 1989-2003. Initially only an arms embargo was introduced, but over time the sanctions were extended. Since the peace agreement of 18 August 2003, the situation in Liberia has gradually stabilised and the country has undergone peaceful and democratic development, largely under the leadership of President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf. Following the peace agreement there were, however, shortcomings in compliance with the existing sanctions. The UN therefore introduced tougher sanctions against Liberia (Security Council Resolutions 1521 and 1532) in 2003 and 2004 respectively. Apart from the arms embargo, the sanctions involved the freezing of assets and travel restrictions on certain people who represented a threat to the peace process in Liberia. In addition, certain restrictions were placed on the timber and diamond trades, which were considered sources of conflict in West Africa, particularly Liberia. These sanctions were lifted in June 2006 and April 2007 following Security Council Resolutions 1689 and 1753 respectively. The current restrictions are primarily directed at non-state actors, former President Charles Taylor and his associates, and goods, etc considered capable of disrupting peaceful development in the country.

and what those sanctions include:

1. Arms embargo

It is prohibited to directly or indirectly supply, sell or transfer arms and related equipment to all non-state entities and people operating in Liberia. Furthermore, it is prohibited to provide technical assistance concerning military activity, including the provision, manufacture, maintenance and use of arms and arms-related equipment of all kinds, including firearms and ammunition, military vehicles and military equipment, paramilitary equipment and spare parts for these, directly or indirectly, to non-state persons, entities or bodies in, or for use in, Liberia.

Thus, there is no longer a general prohibition against the supply, etc. of arms and equipment to Liberia or the provision of technical assistance, etc. concerning military activity in Liberia. This eases the supply, etc, of support to the Liberian state for the security reform efforts concerning Liberia's armed forces, police service, etc.

There are also certain possibilities for exemptions from the sanctions.

2. Travel restrictions

The prohibition applies to entry into or transit through the EU for certain people considered to be a threat to the peace process in Liberia or participating in activities to undermine peace and stability in Liberia and the region. It applies to the former rebel leader and President Charles Taylor, his family and certain others still associated with him. The travel restrictions also apply to people who violate the prohibition against the supply, etc. of arms and equipment and the provision of technical assistance, etc., provide financial or military support to armed rebel groups in Liberia or are linked to entities who do so. The list of the persons who are covered by the travel restrictions is drawn up and updated by the above-mentioned sanctions committee.

3. Freezing of assets

All funds and economic resources that are, directly or indirectly, owned or controlled by Charles Taylor, his family and certain other persons and entities are to be frozen. It is also prohibited to make funds and economic resources available to these persons. The list of the persons who are covered by the restrictions is drawn up by the above-mentioned sanctions committee.

and the relevant EU documents:

Through Council of the European Union Common Position 2008/109/CFSP of 12 February 2008, the former common positions on arms embargo and travel restrictions were consolidated in a single legal act for the sake of clarity. Amendments were made to the common position concerning the arms embargo through Council Decision 2010/129/CFSP of 1 March 2010. The aspects of the Council's common positions and decisions covered by EU law are implemented via Council Regulation 234/2004 of 10 February 2004, most recently amended via Council Regulation 493/2010 of 7 June 2010. The freezing of certain assets and economic resources is regulated in Council Common Position 2004/487/CFSP and Council Regulation 872/2004 of 29 April 2004.

The amendments made by the sanctions committee in the lists of those covered by the individually targeted sanctions are implemented at EU level through regulations from the European Commission. The last time this took place was through Commission Implementing Regulation 116/2012 of 9 February 2012. These documents can be downloaded here. The easiest way to obtain information about those covered by the individually targeted sanctions is to consult the sanctions committee website, which contains lists of those covered by the freezing of assets and travel restrictions. Links to these lists are provided here.

Link:

Sweden EU Liberia sanctions page

 

Categories: EU Updates Liberia Sanctions Sanctions Programs Sanctions Regulations

eric9to5

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